Bechdel Test Movie List

/bech·del test/ n.
1. It has to have at least two [named] women in it
2. Who talk to each other
3. About something besides a man

[[3]] Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2011) [imdb]

This movie passed 3 of 3 tests (although dubious). It was entered by Matthew on 2011-07-14 20:35:38.

Reviews

Comments

Garmonbozia said:
Minerva McGonagall turns to Mrs Weasley after performing the enchantment that brings the statues to life to fight for the school, and says something like "I've always wanted to do that spell..."
Message posted on 2011-07-15 15:39:07
Jadele said:
I don't know what the definition of a 'conversation' is, but there are 3 times in the movie when one female character says something to another female. One is mentioned by Garmonbozia above. Another is when Lily's sister Petunia (not named in the film) tells her 'you're a freak, I'm going to tell mum'. Another one is where Molly Weasley says to Bellatrix Lestrange 'don't touch my daughter you bitch' and then kills her.
Message posted on 2011-07-16 06:22:01
martin said:
the rule is thst at least two women has to talk "to each other" so I would say that both women have to say something for it to count. an of comment here and there from one woman to another without a substansial reply shouldn't be enough.
Message posted on 2011-07-16 10:32:06
dimhir said:
Luna and Cho talk to each other, when Harry asks about Ravenclaw's diadem, and Hermione talks to her daughter at the end.
Message posted on 2011-07-17 02:07:01
srevans said:
Movie is a clear pass.

(1) Cho to Luna, about the diadem: "But the thing is, Luna, it's supposed to be lost."

(2) McGonagall to Molly, after bringing statues to life: "I've always wanted to do that spell."

(3) Young Petunia to Lily, in Snape's memory: "You're a freak, I'm telling mum."

(4) Molly to Bellatrix, before blasting her to pieces: "Not my daughter, you bitch!"
Message posted on 2011-07-17 22:13:40
Pete, Jed and Emma said:
We agree with the rating.

Cho and Luna are both replying to Harry.

McGonagall to Molly is a statement they are not talking to each other.

Petunia to Lily- Petunia isn't named during the film so shouldn't count as a character.

Molly to Bellatrix- unless we count Bellatrix's mad cackling as speech it's a battle cry not a conversation.
Message posted on 2011-07-23 18:01:21
Sally said:
I think the dialogue between Petunia and Lily at least definitely counts - if I remember correctly, it's not just a one-sided remark from Petunia, as Lily is showing her a flower or something and says, "Look!"
And arguing that it doesn't count because Petunia isn't named in the film is ridiculous - the only reason the writers didn't bother is because they've now given up on trying to make the films accessible to anyone who hasn't read the books, and now just assume that the audience will be able to fill in any gaps they leave.
Message posted on 2011-07-24 09:16:10
Nimravid said:
I agree with the original poster, martin, Pete, Jed, and Emma that it gets to the 2 named women point. Petunia isn't named in the movie and there's no scene where any named woman replies to another. I didn't remember Petunia's name even though I read the books; while I was watching the movie I assumed she was a friend of Lily's from school. You might be able to make a case for a major political figure or celebrity not needing to be named in a movie as the general audience would know who they were, but not a minor character whose name is buried somewhere in the 5,000 pages of the books the movie was adapted from. The argument that only people who had read the book closely would know her name, and the general audience wouldn't, pretty much makes the point.
Message posted on 2011-07-24 18:42:24
thepuppetmaster said:
I disagree with the rating because the memory scene between Lily and Petunia should count as a conversation between two main characters. For starters, anyone who has watched at least the first movie would remember the Petunia and Lily are related and that she is really the only character to call magical folks a freak. Like the books, the scriptwriters have added little details that are hard to notice if you aren't a dedicated Potter nerd and have watched the movies/read the books.
Message posted on 2011-07-25 12:10:04
Duncan said:
Two women (check) discuss (check) turning statues into sentient guards (check).

It passes both the letter and the spirit of the test. The letter in so far as there are at least, by my count, seven instances of two female characters trading dialogue unrelated to male characters, as listed by people above, and it passes the spirit in so far as there are any number of non-objectified positive female role models in both the book and the film (no doubt in part because the books were written by a female author who self defines as a feminist).
Message posted on 2011-07-28 18:12:33
Blaire said:
There are the instances of dialogue between female characters mentioned above as well as one more I'd like to point out. You may not hear the entire conversation, but there is clearly dialogue between Professor Trelawney and Padma Patil over the death of Lavender Brown.
Aside from that, there is a large selection of great female characters in the film. Hermione is the one who gets Harry and Ron out of nearly every situation. This movie is definitely a pass.
Message posted on 2011-08-02 19:02:14
Nimravid said:
Please, can anyone who thinks it passes give one line each of dialogue between two female characters who were named in the film? That is all it needs to pass. The two characters need to have been named in the movie itself, and one just needs to speak to the other, and the second one has to reply with even a single line.

If Trelawny and Padma Patil were named in the movie (I don't remember) and they each have a line, that would be the only thing mentioned so far that would be a pass. Does anyone remember their lines, and if they were named in the movie? Or Duncan, if you think the statue scene passes, can you remember if Weasley replied to McGonagall, I didn't hear her reply?
Message posted on 2011-08-07 04:51:57
am said:
Seems a shame if this movie doesn't pass, it comes so close. But with a movie that seems to have little dialogue compared to others I suppose there aren't going to be that many long conversations.
Seems its a perfect example of why the bechdel test is only a test of whether the movie passes the bechdel test - it gives no indication of whether the movie is 'feminist-friendly'.
Message posted on 2011-10-10 05:08:15
Melissa Trible said:
Haven't seen the movie yet, just want to reply to the last comment.
I wouldn't say the Bechdel test gives *no* indication of whether a movie is "feminist-friendly". It is just an indicator, not absolute proof. Something can fail the test and be feminist, something can pass the test and be sexist, but the set of movies that pass the test contains many more feminist movies (per capita, at least) than the set of movies that don't pass the test.
Message posted on 2011-10-22 21:59:12
Nandini said:
I agree with the rating, there's no conversation between two named women in this movie.
Message posted on 2011-11-04 16:58:26
Jen said:
How is a 1/3 a "dubious" passing? Either there are at least two named women [there are] or there aren't.
Message posted on 2011-12-01 22:18:43
north5 said:
Well I'd have called it a pass.
Message posted on 2011-12-09 22:36:17
Aubree said:
Petunia Dursley was one of the first characters introduced in the series. Anyone who has read the books or watched the movies properly should know who she is, therefore the scene between her and Lily should pass. I don't think we need Lily to say, "Why do you call me a freak, Petunia, my sister?" to recognize the character.
Message posted on 2011-12-21 00:10:13
mj said:
Regarding Petunia not being named - she's clearly a character in the series and appears in every other movie. And since this movie opened smack in the middle of the story without recounting any backstory, it was definitely marketed to people who have been following the series and know who Petunia is.
Message posted on 2011-12-27 21:57:50
D said:
I think its unfair to judge this movie separately from the others. Lily and Petunia are both named characters if you look at the series as a whole. Plus, I seem to remember Lily referring to Petunia as "Tuney", which is obviously a nickname. Plus McGonagal talking to Molly and Molly talking to Bellatrix should totally count.
Message posted on 2011-12-28 01:38:19
elfwhistletree said:
There's also the scene with Bellatrix and Narcissa Malfoy, near the end of the film, in the woods, after Harry and Voldemort knock each other out - Bellatrix asks if Harry is dead, Narcissa asks Harry about Draco, but then replies to Bellatrix.

It's pretty short, but I reckon this counts as a conversation between two named female characters, although about a man (Harry). Does it matter that Harry also participates here, although only Narcissa knows that he does?
Message posted on 2011-12-31 02:19:35
Spleak said:
I agree, all of these things you've posted are one or two lines. This test it uses the word talk in place of discussions, so atlest two or three lines of dialogue each.

The fact the woman speaks doesn't really make the character full, it just proves its not a mute.
Message posted on 2012-01-01 18:59:39
Fatima said:
I disagree with this rating completely!

Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows Part 2 definitely passes the Bechdel Test in two very prominent instances! The first was when McGonagol turns to Mrs. Weasley after having conjured the Hogwarts protection spell, and says "I've always wanted to do that." The second was when Bellatrix and Mrs. Weasley were dueling and Mrs. Weasley exclaims, "Not my daughter you bitch." And then proceeds to kill her.

A change in this rating would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
Message posted on 2012-01-19 01:44:24
Victor said:
I agree with the rating. "Who talk to EACH OTHER" means that they have to, you know, talk to EACH OTHER. All of the examples listed seem to be of one character talking to another character, but unless that other character then talks to the first character, they haven't talked to EACH OTHER.
Message posted on 2012-01-19 16:01:17
lp said:
The thing is...when the women are talking about men, i.e. narcissa and bellatrix about harry etc...it's not in a romantic manner and that is, i think, the most important thing about this test...checking if movies only portray women in romantic dilemmas and arguments about boys/men. when the women in harry potter talk to each other they are in such few cases speaking about someone they are romantically interested in...actually, looking back to all the movies i can only remember a time when hermione talked to HARRY about liking ron...the romantic dilemmas in these books and movies are much more the boys' dilemmas.
Message posted on 2012-01-20 16:31:08
Tiarat said:
I think Petunia is an important enough character to count as named. I also recall Lily calling her Tunie as a nickname because it took me a second to process it was a nickname for Petunia. I believe she appears in at least 6 of the 8 movies since Harry lived with her for 10+ years before going to Hogwarts. The only confusion for a casual watcher it if they don't realize that the young Petunia in the flashback is the same person as the middle aged Petunia Durdsly who appears many times in the series. I doubt many people watch this movie without watching as least some of the previous ones in the series though.
Message posted on 2012-02-06 03:45:36
Victor said:
"it's not in a romantic manner and that is, i think, the most important thing about this test...checking if movies only portray women in romantic dilemmas and arguments about boys/men."

I completely disagree. The test isn't checking here for romance. The test is checking here for whether female characters have their own agency and significance to the film or whether their only role is to reinforce the role of a male character.
Message posted on 2012-02-07 01:56:18
Gaith said:
Quoth Victor: "The test is checking here for whether female characters have their own agency and significance to the film or whether their only role is to reinforce the role of a male character."

Bingo.

As a fan of the first four books/movies who's often annoyed that the rest of the series nearly always gets the free pass that it does, I must confess to some entertainment at reading certain above comments vainly attempting to will this movie into a Pass. It doesn't, people. Offhand remarks are not conversations. You all know this.

But, as with many Bechdel Test ratings, this one has touched a nerve, in that it shows women - yes, even Increasingly One-Note Hermione - for the supporting/minor Potter players that they are. Compare any of these movies to the deeply flawed yet unabashedly female-centric "The Golden Compass", and see the extent of the disparity. This is, after all, a series written by a woman who straight-up invented a middle initial in order to hide her lack of a Y chromosome from potential adolescent male customers, and who has retained that obfuscating pen name long after gaining the clout needed to cast it off.
Message posted on 2012-02-11 05:49:37
ruminum said:
No. If "[t]he test is checking here for whether female characters have their own agency and significance to the film or whether their only role is to reinforce the role of a male character," then HP:7-II would definitely pass.

Several female characters (with names, even if not stated in this movie) demonstrate their agency and outside of reinforcement of the main character. McGonagall defends the castle with her own power and her own agency.

The exchange between Lily Potter and her sister Petunia is an exchange meant to display Lily's blossoming power and how it causes a wedge between her and Petunia, who rejects her out of jealousy and calls her a freak.

You can argue that the defense of the castle is mostly an attempt to buy Harry Potter time to complete his mission, but the confrontation between Molly Weasley and Bellatrix is about Molly's desire to protect her child, Ginny, and not about any of the males in her family, a direct attempt to fight Voldemort, or even to support Harry.

The problem with those using this task is that focus on the letter of the test, but not the spirit of it. The spirit of the test is to demonstrate that women contribute strongly to narratives without being subject to active narrative by men first. The naming concept is ludicrously applied here because Petunia Padma or Professor Trelawney aren't explicitly named, with no regard to the context of these characters being part of a series where their names have been introduced and mentioned numerous times, making naming them all over again redundant when viewed as a continuous narrative.

Molly Weasley was never named in the film to my recollection, but anyone watching the films know who she is.

The "name" concept is simply there to avoid a pass given to female characters who talk, but whose characterization and role in the narrative is so lacking and unimportant to the film that they aren't named.

Such an acute application of the rule would be just as inappropriate if a film had several female characters engaging in conversation in a film where NO characters are named. Because you simply forgot what an important character's name was from Part I to Part II isn't reflective of the character suddenly being unimportant to the narrative.
Message posted on 2012-02-17 04:58:32
Gaith said:
"The naming concept is ludicrously applied here because Petunia Padma or Professor Trelawney aren't explicitly named, with no regard to the context of these characters being part of a series where their names have been introduced and mentioned numerous times, making naming them all over again redundant when viewed as a continuous narrative."

Er, no. Names tend to get used fairly often in the course of conversation. The fact that so few females are named in this two-hour movie just goes to show how little their conversations matter relative to that of the males.
Message posted on 2012-02-26 22:48:05
H said:
I agree with the rating. Yes, there are bits and pieces of dialogue between women, but single liners do not a conversation make. No two women in this film come close to having what could be called a conversation.
Message posted on 2012-03-05 18:04:53
Lucy said:
At the end -
Hermione: Bag?
Rose: Yeah.
Hermione: Jumper?
Rose: * nods *
Hermione: I’m going to miss you.

It's not much, but other movies have passed with similar exchanges. And yes, Rose is not named in the movie, but as many have said it was not included as we are expected to know from the books.
Message posted on 2012-03-07 20:42:43
Konrad said:
In response to Gaith's comment: Er, no. Names tend to get used fairly often in the course of conversation. The fact that so few females are named in this two-hour movie just goes to show how little their conversations matter relative to that of the males.

In real life, I hardly ever use names during the course of a conversation. I might call somebody by their name to get their attention and initiate a conversation. Most of the time body language and geographical proximity suffice however. In that sense, sticking to this naming rule is utter bollocks.

As for which character matters or doesn't, you can't apply these qualifications to a movie that is part of a series the way you can to a single movie. The metaverse created is (or should be) much larger and expanded and viewed in this manner.
Message posted on 2012-03-25 08:55:42
Victor said:
I do not buy the argument that we're supposed to know characters' names from the books. This is not the book. This is the movie. This test is a test of the film industry, not a test of fiction in general. The fact remains that, for the film version, some characters were not characterized as deeply or even named. The decision to alter the presentation of the characters in that way for a different medium is something that needs to be examined and judged. The film version downplayed the significance of these characters to the narrative, so while the literary version of this story may pass, the film version does not.
Message posted on 2012-03-25 09:38:22
Cassandra said:
And just as a reminder to HP defenders, that just because the movie might not pass the test, does not mean it's a bad movie. Just that it doesn't pass the test.
Message posted on 2012-04-02 11:19:09
Anna said:
Luna and Cho are both named in the movie.

"Luna Lovegood: Lost diadem of Ravenclaw? Hasn't anyone heard of it? It's quite famous.

Cho Chang: Yes. But Luna, it's lost. For centuries now. There isn't a person alive today who's seen it."

The conversation was prompted by a question asked by Harry, but turns into an exchange between Luna and Cho. Cho at least is clearly not responding to Harry here. She's talking to Luna.
Message posted on 2012-04-10 09:09:57
Ronnie said:
I see that most of the comments don't understand the Bechdel Test.

The three requirements to pass the test are:-

1) Should have atleast 2 NAMED female characters
2) They should have a conversation(both parties must say something directly only to each other)
3) The conversation(no matter how brief) must be about ANYTHING other than a man.


Now if you compare the examples given in comments above mine, you will find that most fail at Condition #2.


I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with the rating, but the result of the test would stand as 'FAILED' unless proven otherwise.
Message posted on 2012-04-11 06:34:39
EW said:
Surely the "named" clause means named in the credits e.g. not "security guard" or "woman in street #1".
Message posted on 2012-04-30 15:10:08
Fiona said:
I love Harry Potter but I don't think this movie passes the test. Shouldn't there be some sort of meaningful interaction between the women. Luna and Cho are responding to Harry. Mrs. Weasley and Professor M. are only delivering comical sound bites. A comic one liner and a response to male character's questions do not constitute conversation.

That being said it still is a wonderful movie and there are plenty of strong inspiring female characters. It is still told essentially from a male perspective (ie Harry Potter) by a third person limited narrator.
Message posted on 2012-05-02 16:28:52
DC said:
Whether or not the conversation was initiated by a male character or even if said character actively participates in the conversation for its duration is irrelevant.
The requirements clearly state:

1. It has to have at least two [named] women in it
2. Who talk to each other
3. About something besides a man

In this sense it does pass the requirements by virtue of the exchange between Cho an Luna, as well as the one between Petunia, named Tuny(a nickname such as "Storm" from the X-men can suffice as a character being named provided the reference is clear and unambiguous) and Lily.
Message posted on 2012-05-17 14:51:51
DC said:
Whether or not the conversation was initiated by a male character or even if said character actively participates in the conversation for its duration is irrelevant.
The requirements clearly state:

1. It has to have at least two [named] women in it
2. Who talk to each other
3. About something besides a man

In this sense it does pass the requirements by virtue of the exchange between Cho an Luna, as well as the one between Petunia, named Tuny(a nickname such as "Storm" from the X-men can suffice as a character being named provided the reference is clear and unambiguous and unique to one character only) and Lily.
Message posted on 2012-05-17 14:55:20
Chrystine said:
There is a difference between passing the test and having feminist messages. Yes Harry Potter has strong female characters in it but the thing is, no two women talk to each other about anything other than a man for longer than a minute. I add that requirement because is it really so hard to ask that two female characters can have a minute of combined screen time when the male characters have much more than that?
Message posted on 2012-05-21 23:01:03
Chris said:
The comments saying Petunia isn't a named character are ridiculous. The requirement isn't that the character's name is stated in the film, it is simply that the character is named.
Petunia is named. How else would we all be calling her Petunia? They didn't state her name again in this film because we've already seen her in six previous ones, but Petunia is still a named character (the name is Petunia, if you haven't figured it out).
Message posted on 2012-06-10 05:24:49
Justin said:
It is ridiculous that anyone here could consider Petunia, Molly, Padma, Trelawney, or any of the aforementioned female characters "unnamed." Aside from the fact that we are using their NAMES to discuss them (meaning we, as well as essentially everyone else who has seen the movie, obviously know who they are), but they are all listed by name in the credits.

And if Lily does call her sister "Tuney" in this movie as so many above posters have stated, then that obviously qualifies it as a pass. It's like saying a character named Beth wouldn't count because her full name is Elizabeth.

They have names, they talk to each other, albeit briefly, and it is not about a man. Pass.
Message posted on 2012-06-11 02:10:01
Kay said:
"Young Petunia Dursley" and "Young Lily Potter" (although technically they should both have the last name "Evans", but that's unrelated) are clearly listed in the closing credits (with the names Ariella Paradise and Ellie Darcey-Alden, respectively.) As EW said, the point is that the girls are given names at all, rather than simply credited as "Young Girl #1" or something of that nature. Having names in the credits means they are NOT unnamed!
Message posted on 2012-06-21 22:16:11
Renee said:
I think the conversation between Young Lily and Young Petunia should count. While only one line of dialogue made it into the movie ("You're a freak, Lily! A freak!") it's not a one-sided exchange. Lily runs away crying. This is a response to what Petunia has said, even if it's not a verbal response. As an actor, I would consider that a dialogue.
Message posted on 2012-07-22 17:19:35
Victor said:
Being named in the credits doesn't count as being named in the film. The credits aren't a part of the story.
Message posted on 2012-07-22 20:31:10
Natalia said:
Okay, this entire movie was the most action-centered Harry Potter movie. There was barely any dialogue between anybody! And there are definitely more than two named female characters. And sure, there was underlying romance (as with LIFE) but men were never openly discussed between women. It's not as if Hermione went up to Luna and was all "Ohmygosh, do you think Ron likes me?" This movie passes.
Message posted on 2012-08-09 16:21:15
Jen said:
Hey, just to argue semantics here, the rule says "Two women who talk to each other." If a man happens to be near them when they are talking to each other, or if the conversation starts with a man but then the women talk TO EACH OTHER, why does that negate a pass?

So since Luna directs her comment to everyone [including Cho], then Cho answers her, semantically speaking it seems to pass. The test gets irritatingly boring if absolutely no men are allowed to be in the vicinity or even hinted at ["a pregnancy must involve a man"--which science has actually disproven!].
Message posted on 2012-08-26 19:07:05
Perfectly Idiomatic said:
This debate has raged long and hard and I want to add my voice to the masses: being named in the books doesn't count. Being named in the credits doesn't count. Being named in the previous films does.
This comes down to the fact that these are the same characters as previously presented; if you haven't seen the previous films, it doesn't matter- if you missed the line of dialogue where a character is named, it doesn't mean they're not named, it means you don't know their name. The names weren't omitted from the film, the characters weren't deemed too unimportant to be named- their names were presumed (rightly or wrongly) to be known.

By this logic (which I know many people will disagree with), the film passes on the basis of Cho and Luna and Trelawney and Padma (all of whom I KNOW have been named previously).
Message posted on 2012-08-27 02:03:02
TMO said:
I am new to the site, so do not weigh my comment with undue significance, but in cases such as this one, is it legitimate to judge a single chapter in a long series without also taking into consideration the other chapters? Shouldn't we test the entire Harry Potter movie series, and others as well, as a whole, rather than each on it's own merits? While this particular movie may or may not barely pass, several of the others pass quite easily, and the characters from those are often present in this one, without necessarily being named, since the audience is presumed to know who they are by now.

Of course, that opens other problems, such as defining which movies are part of a series, or if characters change between them due to different directors or writing staff, etc.
Message posted on 2012-09-18 17:37:43
Snuzzle said:
Everyone who says the women have to be named in the movie is being ridiculous. The first rule only means that it can't be two nobody, throwaway characters like "woman in bar #1." So there's that, it passes rule #1. Tons of named women.

Who have a discussion with each other? Yes, many other commenters above have noted many conversations that the women in this movie have had with one another. Pass rule #2. (Saying the conversation doesn't count if a man is taking part in it too? Really guys?)

So now the only thing stopping us is rule #3... are the conversations about a man? We've got Lily and Petunia discussing Lily's magic for one, even if we've got nothing else (which I would argue we do, but nonetheless) this passes on that merit.

3/3. Full pass.
Message posted on 2012-10-16 17:49:43
Ellorah James said:
The movie is clearly part two. To judge the this on it's own with out part one puts the movie at an unfair disadvantage for disagreement. Part two is not a full movie and therefore should not be judged as a full movie. Deathly Hallows was split into two separate showing but not films as indicated by part 1 and 2 (having the same name).
If graded on it's own opinions gain free reign rather than actual fact about whether it passes. What one thinks is talking changes from person to person and can be blurred by Harry Potter love bias.
Message posted on 2013-01-02 00:39:01
Elle said:
Maybe I'm remembering incorrectly, but I don't think the conversation between Lily and Petunia can technically count. But, I think this movie is an example of why the Bechdel test isn't perfect - this movie maybe three conversations between named characters that Harry isn't a part of. It's just not as much of a conversation-centered movie. So the rating is valid, but it's not a valid source of info on whether the movie is anti-female.
Oh, and Gaith? Yeah, J. K. Rowling did use a less overtly feminine name, but that was entirely on her publisher's request. She was financially struggling and in no position to argue with them. Changing her moniker would only cause confusion.
Message posted on 2013-01-17 13:20:35
Sises said:
I agree with the rating, though it is such a fine line. And after reading through all the comments, here is my conclusion.

There are more than two women in this movie. But they never TALK TO EACH OTHER. They talk within the same vicinity of each other, but not with each other.

Also talking at someone is not a conversation.

Lavender and Trelawney's doesn't count. There was no dialogue, nothing was heard.

Molly's and Bellatrix doesn't count. Molly was talking AT bella, not to her. Bella didn't respond.

No go with Luna and Cho. Cho may have been talking to Luna, but Luna was not talking to Cho. She was talking to Harry specifically, and the entire room generally.

and though Lilly and Petunia had a conversation in the book, in the movie Lily doesn't say anything back. She just walks away and stares as Petunia insults her, then Snape arrives.
Message posted on 2013-06-10 20:18:17
Arabella said:
This movie passes all tests. Cho directly addresses Luna when speaking about the diadem, and when Luna speaks she addresses everyone in the room ("lost diadem? Anyone?"), and "everyone" in this case includes named female characters, of whom Cho is one.
Message posted on 2013-07-08 20:03:45
a said:
If you are quite strict about following the rules, Rose, young Lily, and young Petunia do not count because they are girls, not women.
Message posted on 2013-07-09 15:50:28
Megan said:
I actually agree with the rating, despite being a huge HP fan.

There are definitely more than 2 names female characters (Hermione, Cho, Luna, Ginny, Tonks, the list goes on)

But any movie should not be able to squeak by and pass the test because of a 'dialogue' that lasts less than 10 seconds. All of the debated conversations are short, and often one-sided (verbally, at least).

If we have to argue over approx. 2 lines, then the conversation obviously does not count, especially considering that, out of a 130 minute movie, there isn't at least one female-female conversation not about men that lasts more than a few lines.

Thus, fail.
Message posted on 2013-08-05 22:35:36
Jenny said:
Sises said:
"I agree with the rating, though it is such a fine line. And after reading through all the comments, here is my conclusion.

There are more than two women in this movie. But they never TALK TO EACH OTHER. They talk within the same vicinity of each other, but not with each other.

Also talking at someone is not a conversation.

Lavender and Trelawney's doesn't count. There was no dialogue, nothing was heard.

Molly's and Bellatrix doesn't count. Molly was talking AT bella, not to her. Bella didn't respond.

No go with Luna and Cho. Cho may have been talking to Luna, but Luna was not talking to Cho. She was talking to Harry specifically, and the entire room generally.

and though Lilly and Petunia had a conversation in the book, in the movie Lily doesn't say anything back. She just walks away and stares as Petunia insults her, then Snape arrives."

This is perfect! This movie fails, and I LOVE Harry Potter!
Message posted on 2013-10-19 05:33:32
Joseph said:
I agree. I kind of like the movies, love the books. But I don't think the statements people are describing pass. The closest is the Lily/Petunia thing. Close call, but to really pass, the character should be named. If it is so close that we are wondering about splitting hairs on the rules, which are pretty clear, generally speaking, I would say fail. Not saying whether or not the movie is anti-feminist, just helping to tabulate female presense (or lack thereof) in movies in general. imho.
Message posted on 2013-10-24 20:10:02
michelle said:
I just re-watched this and got these from the subtitles.

1. Luna (to group): Lost diadem of Ravenclaw? Hasn't anyone heard of it? It's quite famous.
Cho (to Luna): Yes, but Luna, it's lost, for centuries now. There isn't a person alive today who's seen it.
Students besides Luna, Cho and Harry speak in this conversation. It is not just a conversation with Harry.

2. Padma: Oh, she's passed.
Trelawney: There, she's gone.

3. Hermione: Bag?
Rose: Yeah.
Hermione: Jumper? I'll miss you.

Lily doesn't speak to Petunia in the memory scene - not in the movie. I would count all of the above as named characters, with some hesitation for Rose, but she is named in the books and credits.
Message posted on 2013-11-10 02:48:08
Carly said:
I just rewatched this film, and it clearly passes, due to this brief exchange near the beginning:

FLEUR: (Handing Hermione some clothing) This is the closest I have to what you were looking for.
HERMIONE: It's perfect, Fleur. Thank you.

Although it's a little short to be called a conversation, it is two women, both of whom are named, talking to each other. I'm surprised so many people missed it.
Message posted on 2014-03-31 01:30:08
neil (webmaster) said:
I've updated the rating from 1/3 to 3/3.
Message posted on 2014-03-31 05:33:20

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